Memory Loss and Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Evaluation

Are you concerned about your memory? Or, are you concerned about a friend or family member who may have trouble with their memory? Let us help! Simply answer the questions below and let us showcase how we can help you or a loved one with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, or memory loss.

COMPLETE THE FREE BRAIN TUNE UP! PROTOCOL MEMORY LOSS ASSESSMENT (AQ-21 MOD) TO RECEIVE YOUR SCORE AND RECEIVE DR. SHARLIN’S INTERPRETED RESULTS.

A score of 4 points or less suggests Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI)

  • At this stage you are aware of your thinking ability, including memory, but this decline cannot be verified by tests or by those who know you. Depending on your age, sometimes this is described as “senior moments.” Is this significant?
  • In a study of 189 normal individuals older than 65 investigators found that those who had concerns about their memory and everyday life on a similar questionnaire were more likely to have buildup of amyloid in the brain, suggesting a greater risk for eventual progression to Alzheimer’s.
  • In an examination of subjective memory complaints as predictors of serious cognitive impairment in 530 subjects (mean age 73 years old) followed over time, investigators found that 72.5% of those who converted to dementia or mild cognitive impairment reported a change in memory before the transition, versus 48.8% of the nonconverters. This suggests that subjective memory decline is predictive of transition to a seriously impaired cognitive state.
  • A study from University of Bonn in Germany found that subjective memory decline in more than 2300 healthy elderly patients predicted a decline in memory over 8 years (AgeCoDe study).
  • If you fall into the category of Subjective Cognitive Decline the time is now to act to preserve and protect your aging brain.

A score between 5-14 points suggests Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

  • Increased forgetfulness. This might include misplacing items and forgetting recently learned information, conversations, or names.
  • Increased disorientation, like forgetting the month, day, or year, or recognizing familiar places.
  • Mild impairment in problem-solving ability, like making change for something you want to buy at the store, simple math abilities, or completing puzzles.
  • You are still independent with most activities although you may struggle with complex tasks, like operating a computer, a television remote, or your smartphone.
  • You may find yourself getting stuck on words or ideas, or the wrong word may come out when you are talking.

A score of 15-19 points suggests possible Early or Mild Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia

  • Moderate memory loss and disorientation. At this stage people you encounter in your life would be aware that something is wrong. They will bring to your attention that you forget conversations, appointments, dates, or display unusual behavior.
  • Problem-solving is impaired. You cannot handle money properly, perform simple math, complete puzzles, accurately interpret road signs.
  • You may have difficulty with performing household tasks, or difficulty with personal care. You may require prompting or supervision with these tasks.
  • Complex tasks are no longer possible. You cannot operate a computer, television remote, or smartphone. Driving is unsafe at this stage.

A score of 20-24 suggests Moderate Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. Chances are this test was taken on behalf of someone else. You may be a caregiver, friend, family, or loved one. At this stage:

  • The person affected experiences pronounced memory loss, including memory of personal details and current events.
  • The person may no longer be able to carry out normal day-to-day activities, such as dressing or bathing without some caregiver assistance.
  • Further symptoms may include sleep difficulty, incontinence, personality changes including paranoia or delusions, anxiety, and inability to recognize loved ones.

A score of 25-27 suggests Severe Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. Chances are this test was taken on behalf of someone else. You may be a caregiver, friend, family, or loved one. At this stage:

  • A person is unable to care for themselves and suffers from both communication and motor impairment. They may lose their ability to speak, walk, or smile without help. They may have trouble eating and swallowing altogether.
  • Further symptoms may include sleep difficulty, incontinence, personality changes including paranoia or delusions, anxiety, and inability to recognize loved ones.
  • A person may be frequently bedridden and immobile. They are vulnerable to infections, especially pneumonia.
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